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May 3, 2016

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Tuesday, May 03, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Forsyth Co Genealogical Society May meeting (Lecture)
Time: 6:30 PM to 8:45 PM
Location: Reynolda Manor Branch Library, 2839 Fairlawn Dr. Winston-Salem, NC 27106

Forsyth County Genealogical Society will meet on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in the auditorium of the Reynolda Manor Public Library, located at 2839 Fairlawn Drive, Winston-Salem, NC. The social is at 6:30 PM; the meeting is at 7:00 PM.The guest speaker will be Michele Doyle of the MESDA library. Established in 1965, MESDA (The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts) is the only museum dedicated to researching, collecting, and exhibiting the decorative arts of the early American South. It houses the finest collection of decorative arts - furniture, ceramics, paintings, needlework, and metalwork - made by artists and artisans working before the Civil War in Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Michelle will describe tools used for crafts as found on estate inventories, as well as Salem's roll as an 18th century “shopping mall” for this area. Meetings of the Forsyth County Genealogical Society are free and open to the public.

Additional Information

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Thursday, May 05, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Friday, May 06, 2016

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Saturday, May 07, 2016

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Angel Bear Yoga: Spring Flower Adventure (Childrens Event)
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

Enjoy the flowers of spring! We’ll read Miss Rumphius and learn how to see the beauty all around us. Learn tree pose, flower pose, and beauty pose. A special animal friend will visit, too!

Additional Information

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Bookmarks Storytime (Childrens Event)
Time: 11:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

Learn more about Bookmarks at bookmarksnc.org.

Additional Information

Thursday, May 12, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Union Station: Past, Present, & Future (Lecture)
Time: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: New Winston Museum

In recognition of Historic Preservation Month and our current exhibition, “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles,” join us for a enlightening panel discussion that explores the history and future plans for Winston-Salem’s 1926 Union Station building. Local train expert, Dr. Jeff Miller, will be joined by Michelle Portman Walter, project manager with Walter Robbs architecture, and Carol Davis of the S. G. Atkins CDC. As the historic property undergoes an exciting restoration, the program will take a look at what lies ahead for the building and the surrounding area. Michelle McCullough from the City of Winston-Salem will moderate.

Additional Information

Bookmarks Summer Reading Kick Off Party (Childrens Event)
Time: 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
Location: William G. White Family YMCA 775 West End Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC

Kids of all ages, parents, and teachers are invited to this free event to learn more about the 2016 Bookmarks Summer Reading Program which helps students, parents, and teachers prepare for the annual Bookmarks Festival of Books and Authors, which, this year, is being held September 8 – 10. K-12 students across North Carolina are invited to participate in the Summer Reading Program with written, visual, and video responses to books on Bookmarks Summer Reading list, including authors and books featured at the Festival, on NC standard reading lists, and as Pulitzer Prize winners. Participants will have the chance to earn books, cash prizes, and more. Enjoy pizza, games, prizes, and a short presentation by 2016 Festival Author Bonnie Doerr. Please reserve your space: https://app.donorview.com/6RV/ or 336-747-1471

Additional Information

Friday, May 13, 2016

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Monkey Hooper Fitness (Childrens Event)
Time: 11:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

It’s May, let’s play! Join Monkey Hooper for hula hooping with custom made hoops, tunnel time, and parachute play. Bring your favorite stuffed animal, and watch it bounce up and down on the parachute!

Additional Information

Book Talk – Winston-Salem’s Historic Salem Cemetery (Book Discussion with Author)
Time: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: New Winston Museum

Molly Grogan Rawls is the photograph collection librarian at the Forsyth County Public Library, and author of several local history books. She will join us to discuss her latest publication which explores the history and significance of Salem Cemetery.

Additional Information

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Thursday, May 19, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Little Tykes (Childrens Event)
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

This program focuses specifically on the developmental skills and interests of young children, ages two and three years old! Children and their caregivers engage one-on-one through songs, stories, creating crafts, and special activities within the museum exhibits. Healthy snack provided. Let the adventures in discovery and purposeful play begin! Registration required for the full series - June 7 - 10, 9-11 a.m. $24/member-child (1 free adult); $32/nonmember-child (1 free adult, CMWS admission included) Pay day-of if space is available: $8/class (1 free adult, CMWS admission included)http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecflkfgtfaa7da39&llr=zd7btqbab&showPage=true

Additional Information

Friday, May 20, 2016

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Daddy/Daughter Spring Fling Dance (Childrens Event)
Time: 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

This spring-themed dance is a special night you will always remember! Enjoy a pizza dinner, craft, cookie decorating, storytime, and dancing! Hearts & Arrows Photography will photograph you and your little girl, a cherished keepsake that will be emailed to you after the event. Printed portraits and high resolution electronic copies of your photos are available for purchase directly from Hearts & Arrows on site. Each girl will leave with a fun-filled goody bag! Registration Required: $10/member, $12/nonmember. Space is limited. http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecazmmyx9a9b2c78&llr=zd7btqbab&showPage=true

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Family Fun Day (Childrens Event)
Time: 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Location: High Point City Lake Park

Family Fun Day is back! Guilford Parent Academy invites you and your family to a day of fun activities together at High Point City Lake Park. GPA is hosting its sixth annual family learning event for children and families of all ages. Activities include FREE swimming and waterslides, playgrounds, mini golf, amusement rides, performances and other recreational activities. Pre-register HERE and avoid lines. You must bring a printed copy of your registration form to the event

Additional Information

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Daniel Wolff And His Salem Clock (History)
Time: 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Historic Bethania

Historic Bethania will celebrate Daniel Wolff and his 1803 tall case clock through a series of lectures on May 22, 2016, from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. The afternoon will include presentations by Mark Farnsworth, Director of Historic Bethania; Johanna Brown, Curator of Moravian Decorative Arts in Old Salem; and Daniel Ackermann, Associate Curator of the MESDA Collection. Discussions will examine the history of the clock’s creation, early documentation, and recent acquisition. Lecture attendees will visit Historic Bethania’s Wolff-Moser house to view the “Clock made August 17, 1803 [by] Daniel Wolff.” Admission is free; donations are appreciated.

Additional Information

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Music & Movement (Childrens Event)
Time: 11:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Children's Museum of Winston-Salem

Come move and groove through songs, fingerplays, and a read aloud. Your child will gain meaningful skills to build upon their language, listening, and physical abilities. Most importantly we will have fun!

Additional Information

Thursday, May 26, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Friday, May 27, 2016

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

Additional Information

Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

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Hina Matsuri: Doll's Day in Japan (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

This mini-exhibit will focus on the Japanese celebration of Doll’s Day, or Hina Matsuri, on March 3 through the display of a traditional doll set. Families often mark the celebration, which is also called Girls’ Day, by setting up a display of dolls representing the Heian period (794-1192) imperial court in their homes. The MOA’s doll set from the 1950s includes 15 dolls and a number of other pieces that create the setting for the court. Admission is free.

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Tuesday, May 31, 2016

ESOL at Jamestown Public Library (Educational)
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Location: Jamestown Public Library

Learn English for free at Jamestown Public Library. Clases de ingles para adultos son gratis. Tuesday and Thursdays starting March 29 from 9:30-12:30. Martes y jueves 9:30-12:30.

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Death at the Crossroads: A Dramatic Reading of Yoruba Art (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

The MOA’s extensive Yoruba collections are showcased in this exhibit, set as a visual narration of Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka's classic play, Death and the King's Horseman. The play takes place in colonial-period Nigeria, West Africa, and centers on the funeral of a Yoruba king and the British government's attempts to stop it. Visitors can trace the character arc of the play’s protagonist, Elesin, through an exploration of Yoruba masks, sculpture, clothing, tools, and musical instruments. The exhibit comments on the themes of the play, including visual/verbal metaphor, power and politics in society, gender roles, colonization, and what it means to lead a good life (and death). Admission is free.

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Incredible Journeys: The Life Histories of Museum Objects (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Wake Forest first-year students in museum studies curated this exhibit exploring the “object biographies” of intriguing specimens in MOA’s collections. The exhibit traces objects from their original use through the missionaries, traders, soldiers, and doctors that acquired them, the connoisseurs that collected them, and finally how anthropologists (and the Museum) might use them. The exhibit showcases the range of the MOA’s collections and the diverse trajectories objects can have. Admission is free.

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Musical Narratives of the Southwest Pacific Rim (Exhibit)
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Highlighting the Museum of Anthropology’s collections of musical instruments, masks, shadow puppets, and dance costumes from Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea, the exhibit takes the visitor on a tour of the performing arts of these regions. The exhibit examines how music, dance, and theater intersect with storytelling, religious practice, gender roles, and modernization. Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit through hands-on music-making with select objects on display. Admission is free.

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